Typos Tank Job Opportunities

Thank you Marcia for this great story. Job Seekers take note; she provides several job search examples in her full article.

Courtesy of Marcia Yudkin, The Marketing Minute:

Occasionally I encounter marketers who insist spelling doesn’t matter. “No one really cares,” their argument goes. “Typos humanize the copy, and besides, everyone knows what we mean.”

Oh, really?

* In 2004, Judge Jacob P. Hart of Philadelphia slashed the fee due an attorney in half because of overabundant typos.

The lawyer lost $31,350.

* In Britain, DDS Media had to destroy 10,000 spelling game DVDs whose cover misspelled a popular TV anchor’s name.

* A Wisconsin-based editor paid an executive recruiter $1,720 to spruce up her resume and send it to 200 potential employers, only to learn that the resumes went out containing a section of gibberish. The editor sued the headhunter for more than $75,000.

* In 2005, a trader on the Tokyo stock exchange intended to trade 1 share at 610,000 yen, but instead placed an order for 610,000 shares at 1 yen each. The firm’s loss: around

$18.7 million.

* A spell-check service whose motto is “no more embarrassing errors” itself uses “then” where “than” is correct. Will potential clients really laugh this off?

*******************

READ MORE: For additional stories about the high cost of typos and a checklist on how to avoid them, go to:

http://www.yudkin.com/typos.htm

Find out what happened when a would-be bank robber just couldn’t spell.

Just say THANKS and build your business

Today’s post is courtesy of Ettiquette Expert Ellen Reddick

When was the last time you received a handwritten thank you note? Perhaps it is easier to remember the last time you expected to receive one but didn’t. “I’m too busy” is an all too familiar excuse for not sending thank you notes these days. As children, we were taught the importance of writing a thank you note to anyone who gave us a present or did something special for us. As adults, the gifts we receive aren’t all tangible, but failing to acknowledge them and say thanks could cost us dearly. Someone giving you their time, advice, business, a business referral or a helping hand is reason enough to express your gratitude with a handwritten note. In this age of faxes, voicemail, email, beepers, and Blackberrys, it is difficult to add the personal touch that is so important to your relationships with clients, vendors, coworkers and prospects. If you find yourself leaving too many messages and sending too many emails at the expense of personal contact, try sending more handwritten notes instead. Why are notes so effective? First, it shows that you care. Everyone is busy and they know that it takes time to handwrite a note. Second, notes stand out among the clutter of technology. How many handwritten notes do you receive on a daily basis compared to emails? Your note is certain to make a positive impact.  

Reasons To Write

  1. Pleasure Meeting You: What better way to solidify a new relationship with a prospect than a follow up note? Be sure to include your business card, and send the note immediately after the event at which you met.
  2. Let’s Make An Appointment: If it has been a while since your last meeting with a client, send a note to suggest getting together to review their current situation and discuss their future needs.
  3. An Apology: A client is more likely to stay with you if you fix a mistake and apologize than if you had never made the mistake to begin with. If you have made a mistake, go out of your way to make it better, starting with a sincerely written note apologizing for your error.
  4. New Business: Always, always, always send a handwritten note thanking a client for their business. Remember, that client could have chosen any number of other professionals, but they chose you. Sincerely thank them for that and tell them you will do your best to serve them.
  5. Referral: Many professionals do not send thank you notes after receiving referrals! That’s a perfect way to tell your clients that you do NOT appreciate their referrals. If you want to keep your stream of new business steady, make absolutely sure to send a note to every client who refers a new client.
  6. Vendors: Good vendors can be hard to find and you need to show your vendors that you appreciate their good products and service by sending a note. Vendors are great advertisers of businesses and you want your vendors to speak well of you and your company.
  7. Refusal: Send notes to prospects that do not choose your services. Let them know you appreciate their consideration and will be available for them in the future if they ever have any additional questions. You will be remembered as a class act.
  8. Saw This And Thought Of You: When you are reading newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals keep your eyes peeled for articles that may interest your clients. When you find one, cut it out and send it to an appropriate client with a handwritten note attached. Your client will be pleased you thought of them.
  9. In The News: Anytime a client, vendor or coworker makes the news, send them an extra copy for their scrapbook along with a quick note. Your client will be pleasantly surprised and think favorably of you and your company.
  10. Interview or Presentation: Send a professional note after a presentation to a group or company. Show that you appreciate the opportunity and would be happy to follow up on any questions.
  11. Coworkers: Everyone likes to be appreciated and coworkers are our support teams and safety nets and deserve handwritten notes acknowledging their value, support and expertise.
  12. Birthdays: A birthday is an important day to everyone and a handwritten note works well for this occasion too. Send at least three note cards a week. Chose the best stationary you can afford and always use a black or blue pen. Send a thank you note within twenty-four hours of a gift or an event. Keep the touch personal by affixing a stamp. Do not send it through your company postage machine.Handwritten notes bring back the personal element in a business world full of impersonal technology. By sending notes, you will outshine your less motivated competition and your clients will take notice and appreciate your thoughtfulness.

Successful people pay attention to the details and look for ways to build better business relationships.  When you take the time to send handwritten notes, you will stand out from the crowd for all the right reasons. Your next big sale or job promotion may come about as a result of your doing business just a little differently.

 There are three very basic things true professional does: 1. Record their own voice mail greeting 2. Wear their nametags on their right shoulder and 3. Write their own thank you notes. The basics of the competitive advantage. 

Ellen  Reddick is the co-founder of Elite Business Communications, Inc., and Elite Business School of Etiquette and Protocol a  Salt Lake City based companies specializing in training, consulting and coaching in business professionalism and communications. Ellen can be reached
at: (801) 581-0269 and
ellen@elitebusinesscommunications.com.      
 

Exec Job Growth Hits Highest Level Since 2000

Compliments of http://www.execunet.com

Recruiters Confidence at New Record as Executive Job Growth Hits Highest
Level Since 2000

Much to the dismay of companies striving to hire top talent during this
surging employment market, the business of recruiting and retaining
executives appears poised to grow even more challenging. ExecuNet’s
Recruiters Confidence Index (RCI) reached a new all-time high in December
amid expectations that executive search assignments will increase by more
than 20% for the second consecutive year in 2007.

According to the survey of 120 executive recruiters, 83% are confident or
very confident the executive employment market will improve during the next
six months — up from 80% last month. Confidence among recruiters has never
been higher in the history of the index.

Confidence In The Executive Employment Market
Next Six Months

Executive recruiters reported a 23% increase in the number of search
assignments they received from corporate clients during 2006 — this
represents the largest increase since the height of the dot-com boom in
2000. Looking ahead, search firms are forecasting a 26% increase in
executive-level job opportunities this year.

Recruiters’ short-term outlook also improved in December, as 82% said they
are confident or very confident the employment market will improve in the
next three months — up from 77% in the previous month. This bullish
assessment of the executive employment market is well supported by the
executive search industry’s own expansion. In December, 60% of all search
firms reported plans to hire additional professional staff during the next
three months, which is considerably higher than the number of firms that
added staff during the past three months (40%).

Executive recruiters who use ExecuNet tell us that companies are
increasingly turning to them for help as it becomes more and more difficult
to find and attract the best talent.

Web 4.0 – Connecting it ALL

Well, I am pumped! Seth Godin wrote another epiphany and I am diggin’ it. In his blog post about Web 4.0 he says:

“Web4 is about making connections, about serendipity and about the network taking initiative.

Some deliberately provocative examples:

I’m typing an email to someone, and we’re brainstorming about doing a business development deal with Apple. A little window pops up and lets me know that David over in our Tucscon office is already having a similar conversation with Apple and perhaps we should coordinate….”

Yeah! That is connected. Thanks for this one Seth. I’ve already sent the link on to several in my network. 4.0 is here.

Read on for the rest of Seth Godin’s post. Enjoy!

Jobs: Hot Picks for 2007

While Melissa and Joan Rivers pick what’s hot and what’s not for the red carpet during the award shows, the employment industry has it’s own predictors for what’s hot – and what’s not – in 2007. Here’s the hot list from Fast Company:

Fast Company’s Top 10 Hot Jobs for 2007 — including hot industries and not-so-traditional jobs:

Experience Designer: Work in the retail industry, creating a shopping experience unique to the particular store/product

Medical Researcher: Most coveted in the healthcare industry is research of cancer, Alzheimer disease, and the development of prosthetics

Web designer: According to Trendsearch.com, the profession is still developing, and 2007 will see a new era of web design

Security Systems Engineer: Employees in the protective services industry can expect to be in demand and a rise in salary in 2007. Individual with a head for engineering and computers can expect up to seven-figure salaries.

Urban Planners: Pre-fab one-level homes for baby boomers are changing the face of suburban America and boosting the demand for urban planners…

Viral Marketers and Media Promoters: Viral marketers are those who know how to build an audience from nothing with little more than rumor and excitement, like MySpace.

Talent Agents: As fame rises for performers and athletes, a new arena opens for their managers, promoters, and general go-to guys. These are some of the most competitive positions in the entertainment industry.

Buyers and Purchasing Agents: The future of the retail industry lies in the hands of the buyers and purchasing agents, according to Trends Journal.

Art Directors: There will be a high demand for the 20 – 30 age demographic for jobs involving painting, lights, cameras, and action.

News Analysts, Reporters, and Bloggers: Publications with an online division now hire three levels of correspondents: print new writers, online news writers, and bloggers.

Read more:
http://www.fastcompany.com/articles/2007/01/top_jobs_2007.html   


 

Sending your resume: What’s in a Name?

Today I received an email:

“Dear Ms. B-V (the person did spell out the last name…):

I have been searching for a job, sending out resumes and smoke signals all over the country only to find my search in vain. I read your suggestions and advice on how to land an interview, techniques to get employers to return your call and Top 10 Secrets to Turn Networking Pain to Career Gain. Which brought me to the conclusion that I would make a good candidate for your company….”

You would? I don’t think so. Here’s why:

1. I am NOT Ms. B-V. So the writer addressed the email to the wrong person – even though the writer said they read my article.

2. They attached this note (complete with several grammatical errors) and their resume, on top of the full e-zine (where the article appeared). Instead, they could have mentioned the article and name of the e-zine in the note. That way, their note and resume would have downloaded much faster – and have been more relevant.

(Speaking of grammatical errors, you may have noticed I used “they” rather than he or she in order to protect the gender of the writer. This advice is advice anyone can use. :)) 

3. Why would reading my article draw them to the conclusion that they’d be a great candidate for my company? Nowhere in the article did I say I was hiring (I’m not – so don’t get any ideas).

4. If this person truly read my article, they would have been referred to me through someone I know (my article was about networking) AND they would have used my correct name.

It’s A-OK to try a cold-call approach. But there is a right way to do it.

1. Research the company!

2. Make sure your experience would be a right fit: During your research, did you discover a problem you could solve for the company? If so, convey your value when you send your email.

3. When writing your email, spell check it before you send it. And have a friend read it to ensure there are no additional grammatical errors.

4. Address your cover letter to the the right decision maker – using the correct name (and spell it correctly too).

5. One better – talk to your friends, family, alumni – your network – to see if you already have a connection to the right decision maker. If you do, ask your friend’s permission to get connected. Then it’s a warm call – not a cold one.

Good luck!